The f/stop: This Week in Digital Marketing

website optimizationYou Just Need One of These to Make It Matter to Google

Google will now display the star rating for a business within their search results with as little as one review. In the past, Google required at least 5 reviews to be created for a business before they would display the star ratings.

According to Invespcro, “90% of consumers read online reviews before visiting a business and 88% of consumers trust online reviews as much as personal recommendations.” With the new threshold, business owners should really focus on encouraging customers to leave their rating and feedback. Having star ratings displayed in the SERPs gives your business an advantage to others in the SERPs since they do stand out to increase the visibility of your listing.

With the new threshold, business owners should really focus on encouraging customers to leave their rating and feedback. Having star ratings displayed in the SERPs gives your business an advantage to others in the SERPs, since they do stand out to increase the visibility of your listing.

The Return of the AMP

Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMPs) are now being displayed in the search results in the most recent version of Google’s app for iOS devices. Google announced AMP pages last year which promised pages that load 4 times faster and use 10 times less data than traditional pages. This would use fewer resources for website owners, give readers the opportunity to engage with their websites longer, and provide a better overall user experience.

Similar to mobile results on Android devices, AMP pages in Google’s search results for iOS are marked with a small lightning bolt icon. Clicking on those results will send you to the AMP version of the article instantly.

A recent study showed that about 7% of traffic to the web’s top publishers in the US are going to AMP pages. There has been speculation that Google will soon display AMP results for other types of content like blog posts.

accelerated mobile pages

Fight Page Speed Bloat

Google continues to iterate the importance of mobile page speed, as seen in their analysis of 900,000 mobile sites. In short, their conclusion is “the majority of mobile sites are slow and bloated with too many elements.”

In their report, Google includes benchmarks for how specific industries are performing in 4 aspects of page speed:

page speed factors for website optimization

  • Currently, no industries are succeeding in meeting Google’s “best practice” guidelines, but the auto, tech, retail, and travel industries have the most room for growth.
  • The average time it takes to fully load a mobile landing page is 22 seconds. Yet, 53% of mobile site visitors leave a page that takes longer than three seconds to load.
  • 70% of pages were over 1MB (Google recommends 500KB)
  • More than half of web traffic comes from mobile, but mobile conversion rates are much lower than desktop. Speed = revenue.
  • 30% of pages could save over 250KB simply by compressing images and text
  • Google encourages site owners to use the Test My Site tool, which tests mobile-friendliness and mobile page speed, and compares it against latest benchmarks.

Want more Digital F/Stop goodness? Read what was going on in the world of digital in February.



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